Advertisement
Cell Reports
All content is freely available to readers and supported through open access

Aug 18, 2015

Volume 12Issue 7p1069-1216
Open Access
On the cover: Macrophages are numerous in the adult mammalian testis and interact with multiple cell types, although their diverse roles are likely underappreciated. In this issue, DeFalco et al. describe distinct testicular macrophage populations and demonstrate a role for macrophages in the spermatogonial niche by promoting differentiation of spermatogonial precursors. Shown here is a testicular macrophage (green cell) intimately overlying undifferentiated spermatogonia (red cells) in the adult testis....
On the cover: Macrophages are numerous in the adult mammalian testis and interact with multiple cell types, although their diverse roles are likely underappreciated. In this issue, DeFalco et al. describe distinct testicular macrophage populations and demonstrate a role for macrophages in the spermatogonial niche by promoting differentiation of spermatogonial precursors. Shown here is a testicular macrophage (green cell) intimately overlying undifferentiated spermatogonia (red cells) in the adult testis.

Preview

Reports

Articles

  • Macrophages Contribute to the Spermatogonial Niche in the Adult Testis

    • Tony DeFalco,
    • Sarah J. Potter,
    • Alyna V. Williams,
    • Brittain Waller,
    • Matthew J. Kan,
    • Blanche Capel
    Macrophages are abundant in the adult mammalian testis, but not much is known about how they directly affect spermatogenesis. DeFalco et al. describe a role for testicular macrophages, showing that they are enriched near spermatogonial precursors and are required for spermatogonial differentiation, potentially acting through CSF1 and retinoic acid pathways.
  • Neutrophils Regulate Humoral Autoimmunity by Restricting Interferon-γ Production via the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    • Xinfang Huang,
    • Jingjing Li,
    • Stephanie Dorta-Estremera,
    • Jeremy Di Domizio,
    • Scott M. Anthony,
    • Stephanie S. Watowich,
    • Daniel Popkin,
    • Zheng Liu,
    • Philip Brohawn,
    • Yihong Yao,
    • Kimberly S. Schluns,
    • Lewis L. Lanier,
    • Wei Cao
    Huang et al. find that IFN-α/β produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) stimulates NK cells to secrete IFN-γ, which is essential for the development of autoantibodies. ROS-producing neutrophils negatively regulate this NK-IFN-γ pathway and control autoimmune progression in lupus-prone mice.
  • Overlapping Requirements for Tet2 and Tet3 in Normal Development and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Emergence

    • Cheng Li,
    • Yahui Lan,
    • Lianna Schwartz-Orbach,
    • Evgenia Korol,
    • Mamta Tahiliani,
    • Todd Evans,
    • Mary G. Goll
    The Tet proteins comprise a family of dioxygenases that convert 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. Li et al. identify Tet2 and Tet3 as the major 5-methylcytosine dioxygenases in the zebrafish embryo and uncover an overlapping requirement for Tet2 and Tet3 in hematopoietic stem cell emergence.
  • Serotonin Mediates Maternal Effects and Directs Developmental and Behavioral Changes in the Progeny of Snails

    • Evgeny Ivashkin,
    • Marina Yu. Khabarova,
    • Victoria Melnikova,
    • Leonid P. Nezlin,
    • Olga Kharchenko,
    • Elena E. Voronezhskaya,
    • Igor Adameyko
    Ivashkin et al. reveal that maternally derived serotonin tunes the developmental dynamics and behavior of snail offspring under changing environmental conditions. The balance of intra- and extracellular serotonin exclusively during the non-neural stage of development, as well as serotonylation of proteins, is crucial for the transmission of a serotonin-based non-genetic signal.
  • MBNL Sequestration by Toxic RNAs and RNA Misprocessing in the Myotonic Dystrophy Brain

    • Marianne Goodwin,
    • Apoorva Mohan,
    • Ranjan Batra,
    • Kuang-Yung Lee,
    • Konstantinos Charizanis,
    • Francisco José Fernández Gómez,
    • Sabiha Eddarkaoui,
    • Nicolas Sergeant,
    • Luc Buée,
    • Takashi Kimura,
    • H. Brent Clark,
    • Joline Dalton,
    • Kenji Takamura,
    • Sebastien M. Weyn-Vanhentenryck,
    • Chaolin Zhang,
    • Tammy Reid,
    • Laura P.W. Ranum,
    • John W. Day,
    • Maurice S. Swanson
    In neurological disorders caused by non-coding microsatellite expansions, disease is caused by expression of toxic tandem repeat RNAs. Goodwin et al. show that MBNL2 is directly sequestered by toxic RNAs in the human brain, leading to aberrant splicing and polyadenylation of numerous target RNAs.
  • Exome Sequence Analysis Suggests that Genetic Burden Contributes to Phenotypic Variability and Complex Neuropathy

    • Claudia Gonzaga-Jauregui,
    • Tamar Harel,
    • Tomasz Gambin,
    • Maria Kousi,
    • Laurie B. Griffin,
    • Ludmila Francescatto,
    • Burcak Ozes,
    • Ender Karaca,
    • Shalini N. Jhangiani,
    • Matthew N. Bainbridge,
    • Kim S. Lawson,
    • Davut Pehlivan,
    • Yuji Okamoto,
    • Marjorie Withers,
    • Pedro Mancias,
    • Anne Slavotinek,
    • Pamela J. Reitnauer,
    • Meryem T. Goksungur,
    • Michael Shy,
    • Thomas O. Crawford,
    • Michel Koenig,
    • Jason Willer,
    • Brittany N. Flores,
    • Igor Pediaditrakis,
    • Onder Us,
    • Wojciech Wiszniewski,
    • Yesim Parman,
    • Anthony Antonellis,
    • Donna M. Muzny,
    • Baylor-Hopkins Center for Mendelian Genomics,
    • Nicholas Katsanis,
    • Esra Battaloglu,
    • Eric Boerwinkle,
    • Richard A. Gibbs,
    • James R. Lupski
    Peripheral neuropathy is a clinically variable and genetically heterogeneous disease. In a cohort of patients, Gonzaga-Jauregui et al. have identified causative variants in ∼45% of the families studied, proposed candidate disease genes for an additional three families, and recognized a significant mutation burden in patients versus controls that likely contributes to phenotypic variability.
  • Role of DNA Methylation in Modulating Transcription Factor Occupancy

    • Matthew T. Maurano,
    • Hao Wang,
    • Sam John,
    • Anthony Shafer,
    • Theresa Canfield,
    • Kristen Lee,
    • John A. Stamatoyannopoulos
    Alterations of DNA methylation in malignancy and development are frequently interpreted as affecting transcriptional activity. Maurano et al. find that, upon genomic abrogation of DNA methylation, binding of the canonically methylation-sensitive transcriptional regulator CTCF is largely unaffected. Their results suggest that a limited set of methylation-sensitive CTCF sites are variable across cell types and that key sequence and chromatin features predict methylation sensitivity of CTCF binding.
  • Heterotypic Signals from Neural HSF-1 Separate Thermotolerance from Longevity

    • Peter M. Douglas,
    • Nathan A. Baird,
    • Milos S. Simic,
    • Sarah Uhlein,
    • Mark A. McCormick,
    • Suzanne C. Wolff,
    • Brian K. Kennedy,
    • Andrew Dillin
    The heat shock transcription factor, HSF-1, regulates lifespan and stress resistance in C. elegans. Douglas et al. find that HSF-1 acts in neurons to emit divergent signals that independently regulate aging and thermotolerance. Thus, a single transcription factor can act within different neurons to modulate distinct protective responses in peripheral tissues.

Resource

Advertisement
Advertisement