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Cell Systems
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Sep 21, 2022

Volume 13Issue 9p683-780
On the cover: Photo of a colony of paper wasps (Polistes canadensis) with a phase portrait depicting the dynamics of the population structure in the background. Combining theory and experiments, Patalano et al. (p. 768) show that both robust specialization and rapid plasticity in primitive social wasps result from a self-organized balance between the development of a molecular queen phenotype and its colony-scale inhibition. This allows Polistes to be stable against intrinsic molecular perturbations while reacting plastically to extrinsic cues. Image credit: the authors....
On the cover: Photo of a colony of paper wasps (Polistes canadensis) with a phase portrait depicting the dynamics of the population structure in the background. Combining theory and experiments, Patalano et al. (p. 768) show that both robust specialization and rapid plasticity in primitive social wasps result from a self-organized balance between the development of a molecular queen phenotype and its colony-scale inhibition. This allows Polistes to be stable against intrinsic molecular perturbations while reacting plastically to extrinsic cues. Image credit: the authors.

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    Featured Article
  • What are the current driving questions in immune repertoire research?

    • Victor Greiff,
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    Adaptive immune receptors (AIRs: B cell receptors [BCRs] and/or T cell receptors [TCRs]) can recognize nearly any antigen by incredibly diverse AIR repertoires (AIRRs). AIRs are crucial to fighting infection but may inflict autoimmunity. Although current public AIR(R) sequence and structural databases are expanding rapidly in size, the majority of the stored data are antigen unlabeled. This leaves our knowledge of antigen specificity, one of the hallmark features of AIR mechanisms of action, scarce and hinders the precision manipulation and prediction of adaptive immunity.

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    Featured Article
  • Archetype tasks link intratumoral heterogeneity to plasticity and cancer hallmarks in small cell lung cancer

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    • Doug P. Hardin,
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    Groves et al. revisit small cell lung cancer intra-tumor heterogeneity by applying archetypal analysis and produce actionable insights into functional task trade-offs as drivers of cancer cell plasticity.
  • Emergence of synchronized multicellular mechanosensing from spatiotemporal integration of heterogeneous single-cell information transfer

    • Amos Zamir,
    • Guanyu Li,
    • Katelyn Chase,
    • Robert Moskovitch,
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    Open Access
    We quantitatively characterized the process of mechanically stimulated multicellular calcium synchronization. By applying Granger causality and network analysis to live movies, we revealed that increased connectivity, heterogeneity, and memory at the cellular scale facilitated the emergence of synchronization across a multicellular network by gradual transition from local to global information spread.
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    • Mohammad H. Rohban,
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    Open Access
    If a chemical compound and a gene overexpression yield the same cell morphology in the microscopy-based assay Cell Painting, then they are likely to impact the same functions. This principle is exploited to retrieve useful compounds for particular query genes in public Cell Painting datasets.

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  • Self-organization of plasticity and specialization in a primitively social insect

    • Solenn Patalano,
    • Adolfo Alsina,
    • Carlos Gregorio-Rodríguez,
    • Martin Bachman,
    • Stephanie Dreier,
    • Irene Hernando-Herraez,
    • Paulin Nana,
    • Shankar Balasubramanian,
    • Seirian Sumner,
    • Wolf Reik,
    • Steffen Rulands
    Open Access
    Combining theory with experiments, Patalano et al. show that both robust specialization and rapid plasticity in primitive social wasps result from a self-organized balance between the development of a molecular queen phenotype and its colony-scale inhibition. This allows Polistes to be stable against intrinsic molecular perturbations while reacting plastically to extrinsic cues.
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