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Cell Systems
This journal offers authors two options (open access or subscription) to publish research

Jul 26, 2017

Volume 5Issue 1p1-86
Open Archive
On the cover: A silhouette of a 3D scan of a tomato plant (white) with the x, y, and z coordinates of the leaves shown in green. Using these scans, Conn et al. (pp. 53–62) evaluated the trade-offs plants make when transporting nutrients throughout their complex architectures. The design is an homage to Henri Matisse's “Algue blanche sur fond orange et rouge,” 1947....
On the cover: A silhouette of a 3D scan of a tomato plant (white) with the x, y, and z coordinates of the leaves shown in green. Using these scans, Conn et al. (pp. 53–62) evaluated the trade-offs plants make when transporting nutrients throughout their complex architectures. The design is an homage to Henri Matisse's “Algue blanche sur fond orange et rouge,” 1947.

Editorial

  • New Isn’t Everything

    • Quincey Justman
    “What’s this I hear? Is it the sound of the frontiers being pushed back?” This was one of my post-doc advisor’s favorite jokes. He usually made it as he swanned through the lab, looking for a fresh observation to be curious about. Indeed, the intellectual equivalent of, “go west, young man,” pervades the biological sciences; many careers in biology are animated by the promise of discovery.

Cell Systems Call

Commentary

  • A Systems Approach to Healthcare Innovation Using the MIT Hacking Medicine Model

    • Tatyana A. Gubin,
    • Hari P. Iyer,
    • Shirlene N. Liew,
    • Aartik Sarma,
    • Alex Revelos,
    • João Ribas,
    • Babak Movassaghi,
    • Zen M. Chu,
    • Ayesha N. Khalid,
    • Maulik D. Majmudar,
    • Christopher (Xiang) Lee
    MIT Hacking Medicine is a student, academic, and community-led organization that uses systems-oriented “healthcare hacking” to address challenges around innovation in healthcare. The group has organized more than 80 events around the world that attract participants with diverse backgrounds. These participants are trained to address clinical needs from the perspective of multiple stakeholders and emphasize utility and implementation viability of proposed solutions. We describe the MIT Hacking Medicine model as a potential method to integrate collaboration and training in rapid innovation techniques into academic medical centers. Built upon a systems approach to healthcare innovation, the time-compressed but expertly guided nature of the events could enable more widely accessible preliminary training in systems-level innovation methodology, as well as creating a structured opportunity for interdisciplinary congregation and collaboration.

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