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Current Biology
This journal offers authors two options (open access or subscription) to publish research

Apr 03, 2017

Volume 27Issue 7p929-1084, R243-R282
Open Archive
On the cover: Representatives of one of the most vividly colored families (Chrysididae) of the mega-diverse insect order Hymenoptera (i.e., sawflies, wasps, ants, and bees). Peters et al. (pages 1013–1018) and Branstetter et al. (pages 1019–1025) present their research on the phylogeny and evolution of Hymenoptera and Aculeata (i.e., stinging wasps), respectively, based on phylogenomic data and fossils. The latter were used to estimate divergence times. Hymenoptera are one of the most species-rich groups of animals, and their representatives exhibit a plethora of body forms and life histories whose evolutionary roots have now been identified. Images by Oliver Niehuis, with assistance from Marina Niehuis and Tanja Ziesmann....
On the cover: Representatives of one of the most vividly colored families (Chrysididae) of the mega-diverse insect order Hymenoptera (i.e., sawflies, wasps, ants, and bees). Peters et al. (pages 1013–1018) and Branstetter et al. (pages 1019–1025) present their research on the phylogeny and evolution of Hymenoptera and Aculeata (i.e., stinging wasps), respectively, based on phylogenomic data and fossils. The latter were used to estimate divergence times. Hymenoptera are one of the most species-rich groups of animals, and their representatives exhibit a plethora of body forms and life histories whose evolutionary roots have now been identified. Images by Oliver Niehuis, with assistance from Marina Niehuis and Tanja Ziesmann.

Magazine

Feature

  • A new continent for human evolution

    • Michael Gross
    Spectacular fossil finds made in China, along with an ambitious research programme and soon to be complemented by studies of ancient genomes, are raising the profile of Chinese palaeoanthropology. New findings are likely to add complexity to the established ‘out of Africa’ model describing the emergence of our species and its spread around the world.

Q & A

Book review

  • Searching for ourselves

    • Frederike Beyer
    In this book, Levine explores the nature of human identity, and particularly our concept of ourselves as a unified entity. He sets out to support the main thesis of his book — namely that the self as we understand it is a mere illusion — an image we conjure to perceive ourselves as continuous existences. To prove this point, Levine explores human nature on virtually all possible levels, from our genetic basis all the way up to identity as a social construct. In doing so, he unleashes a great scope of interesting facts upon his readers to show the multitudes of identities that make up a single person.

Quick guide

Primer

  • Platyhelminthes

    • James J. Collins III
    When you think about flatworms, or Platyhelminthes, what first comes to mind may be your high school biology class or some unpleasant parasitic infection. However, here James Collins explores the fascinating biology of Platyhelminthes and describes how they have become powerful models to study the basis of stem cell regulation and tissue regeneration.

Correspondence

  • The first European cave fish

    • Jasminca Behrmann-Godel,
    • Arne W. Nolte,
    • Joachim Kreiselmaier,
    • Roland Berka,
    • Jörg Freyhof
    Behrmann-Godel et al. discovered the first European cavefish in an underground karst water system in Southern Germany. Fish show clear adaptations to subterranean life (reduced eyes and pigmentation), are genetically differentiated from surface populations, are of recent post-glacial origin and represent the northernmost cavefish ever found.

Dispatches

Articles

Reports

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