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Developmental Cell
This journal offers authors two options (open access or subscription) to publish research

Sep 12, 2022

Volume 57Issue 17p2041-2150
On the cover: Progenitor progression into a complete plant system during de novo shoot regeneration is re-imagined in a humanoid fashion. In this abstraction, a white line connects the progressive stages of development from bottom up. A glass shell (signifying the shell of cells expressing cell-wall loosening enzyme, XTH9) generates a circumferential force field around the progenitor and “encapsulates” the young progenitor (juvenile plants shown in the lower two images). This is until the progenitor has grown enough to “break open” the shell from within to emerge and develop into a fully grown plant. The progression from “slouched” form with bud flower to “upright” form with flower (in full bloom) conveys the finer aspects of later plant development. To learn more about cell wall changes and how mechanical stress in progenitor cells affect plant shoot regeneration, see Varapparambath et al. 2063–2080....
On the cover: Progenitor progression into a complete plant system during de novo shoot regeneration is re-imagined in a humanoid fashion. In this abstraction, a white line connects the progressive stages of development from bottom up. A glass shell (signifying the shell of cells expressing cell-wall loosening enzyme, XTH9) generates a circumferential force field around the progenitor and “encapsulates” the young progenitor (juvenile plants shown in the lower two images). This is until the progenitor has grown enough to “break open” the shell from within to emerge and develop into a fully grown plant. The progression from “slouched” form with bud flower to “upright” form with flower (in full bloom) conveys the finer aspects of later plant development. To learn more about cell wall changes and how mechanical stress in progenitor cells affect plant shoot regeneration, see Varapparambath et al. 2063–2080.

Previews

  • A limb bud morphogen bites the dust

    • Hyunji Lee,
    • Steven A. Vokes
    Hedgehog signaling has traditionally been considered to be a morphogen for digits. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Zhu et al. show that a brief exposure to Sonic Hedgehog is sufficient for digit specification, and this finding suggests that it is not acting as a direct morphogen but rather as an initiator of this process.
  • Shoot meristem progenitors emerge from mechanical heterogeneities

    • Olivier Hamant
    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Varapparambath et al. identify a new module that is instrumental for the selection of meristem progenitor cells in undifferentiated tissues. This module is triggered by mechanical feedback, and it integrates extracellular matrix modification, polar hormone transport, and transcription factors.
  • A novel Ca2+ sensor switch for elevated salt tolerance in plants

    • Poonam Mehra,
    • Malcolm J. Bennett
    Calcium signaling is vital for sensing and alleviating salt stress in plants. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Steinhorst et al. show that salt stress quantitatively translates into an increasing Ca2+ signaling output that activates the CBL8-CIPK24-SOS1 module, which, functioning with CBL4-CIPK24-SOS1, confers enhanced salt tolerance under severe salinity stress.

Articles

  • Sonic hedgehog is not a limb morphogen but acts as a trigger to specify all digits in mice

    • Jianjian Zhu,
    • Rashmi Patel,
    • Anna Trofka,
    • Brian D. Harfe,
    • Susan Mackem
    Open Access
    Zhu et al. use a genetic strategy in the mouse limb to uncouple Shh roles in patterning from cell survival and test how Shh specifies distinct digit types. They show that Shh acts as a trigger, rather than a graded morphogen, to initiate an indirect downstream network that becomes rapidly self-sustaining.
  • Mechanical conflict caused by a cell-wall-loosening enzyme activates de novo shoot regeneration

    • Vijina Varapparambath,
    • Mabel Maria Mathew,
    • Anju Pallipurath Shanmukhan,
    • Dhanya Radhakrishnan,
    • Abdul Kareem,
    • Shubham Verma,
    • João Jacob Ramalho,
    • Bejoy Manoj,
    • Archana Rajan Vellandath,
    • Mohammed Aiyaz,
    • Raji Krishna Radha,
    • Amit N. Landge,
    • Ari Pekka Mähönen,
    • Marcus G. Heisler,
    • Dolf Weijers,
    • Kalika Prasad
    Varapparambath et al. identify how a CUC2-XTH9-driven regulatory axis causes feedback between progenitors and surrounding cells to activate shoot regeneration from undifferentiated callus in Arabidopsis thaliana.
  • A Ca2+-sensor switch for tolerance to elevated salt stress in Arabidopsis

    • Leonie Steinhorst,
    • Gefeng He,
    • Lena K. Moore,
    • Stefanie Schültke,
    • Ina Schmitz-Thom,
    • Yibo Cao,
    • Kenji Hashimoto,
    • Zaida Andrés,
    • Katrin Piepenburg,
    • Paula Ragel,
    • Smrutisanjita Behera,
    • Bader O. Almutairi,
    • Oliver Batistič,
    • Thomas Wyganowski,
    • Philipp Köster,
    • Kai H. Edel,
    • Chunxia Zhang,
    • Melanie Krebs,
    • Caifu Jiang,
    • Yan Guo,
    • Francisco J. Quintero,
    • Ralph Bock,
    • Jörg Kudla
    Salt stress is detrimental to plants. Steinhorst et al. reveal how plants measure salt stress intensity. The authors report that stress intensity quantitatively determines Ca2+-signal amplitude and delineates a signal-intensity-dependent Ca2+-sensor switch in Arabidopsis, allowing for efficient fine tuning of adaptive salt tolerance.
  • Slow muscles guide fast myocyte fusion to ensure robust myotome formation despite the high spatiotemporal stochasticity of fusion events

    • Mario A. Mendieta-Serrano,
    • Sunandan Dhar,
    • Boon Heng Ng,
    • Rachna Narayanan,
    • Jorge J.Y. Lee,
    • Hui Ting Ong,
    • Pearlyn Jia Ying Toh,
    • Adrian Röllin,
    • Sudipto Roy,
    • Timothy E. Saunders
    Open Access
    Mendieta-Serrano et al. report a detailed in toto spatiotemporal census of fast myocyte fusion during skeletal muscle development in zebrafish. Although individual fusion events are highly stochastic, slow muscle migration generates a coordinated wave of fusion at the tissue scale that ensures a robust structural positioning of multinucleated fast muscles.
  • Directed cell invasion and asymmetric adhesion drive tissue elongation and turning in C. elegans gonad morphogenesis

    • Priti Agarwal,
    • Tom Shemesh,
    • Ronen Zaidel-Bar
    Agarwal et al. investigate the mechanics of C. elegans gonad morphogenesis in this study. They show that tissue elongation results from leader cell invasion powered by localized matrix degradation and the proliferative pressure of follower cells, while asymmetric cell-ECM adhesion creates torque that drives the U-turning of the gonad.

Resource

  • The spatiotemporal dynamics of microglia across the human lifespan

    • David A. Menassa,
    • Tim A.O. Muntslag,
    • Maria Martin-Estebané,
    • Liam Barry-Carroll,
    • Mark A. Chapman,
    • Istvan Adorjan,
    • Teadora Tyler,
    • Bethany Turnbull,
    • Matthew J.J. Rose-Zerilli,
    • James A.R. Nicoll,
    • Zeljka Krsnik,
    • Ivica Kostovic,
    • Diego Gomez-Nicola
    Open Access
    Microglial cells are pivotal players in brain development and function. However, most of our knowledge about their development derives from rodents. Menassa et al. describe the dynamics of microglia across the human lifespan from early gestation until old age, identifying distinct dynamics that are intimately associated with key neurodevelopmental hallmarks.

Technology

  • 4D reconstruction of murine developmental trajectories using spherical harmonics

    • Giovanni Dalmasso,
    • Marco Musy,
    • Martina Niksic,
    • Alexandre Robert-Moreno,
    • Claudio Badía-Careaga,
    • Juan Jose Sanz-Ezquerro,
    • James Sharpe
    Open Access
    Continuous time-lapse imaging of developing mammalian organs is not yet possible. Dalmasso et al. propose a computer-based approach to recreate a continuous evolution in time and space from a set of 3D volumetric images using spherical harmonics. The result allows for a data-driven quantitative 4D description of limb and heart morphogenesis.
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