Advertisement
Developmental Cell
This journal offers authors two options (open access or subscription) to publish research

Oct 27, 2014

Volume 31Issue 2p137-256
Open Archive
On the cover: An artist’s representation of studies utilizing computational analysis of the shapes and microtubule arrangements in different S. pombe mutants. For more information on the systematic parallel screening of genes and relationships governing cell cycle, cell shape, and microtubule architecture in fission yeast, see Graml et al., pp. 227–239. Artwork by Claudia Stocker (http://www.claudiastocker.com/)....
On the cover: An artist’s representation of studies utilizing computational analysis of the shapes and microtubule arrangements in different S. pombe mutants. For more information on the systematic parallel screening of genes and relationships governing cell cycle, cell shape, and microtubule architecture in fission yeast, see Graml et al., pp. 227–239. Artwork by Claudia Stocker (http://www.claudiastocker.com/).

Previews

  • Calluses Flex Their Muscles to Align Bone Fragments during Fracture Repair

    • Jacqueline Nguyen,
    • Tamara Alliston
    Neonatal animals spontaneously reduce fractures, yet the mechanical forces influencing this process are poorly understood. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Rot et al. (2014) show that muscle and the fracture callus actively position fractured neonatal bone fragments to restore their alignment, highlighting the multifaceted roles of mechanical cues in skeletal regeneration.
  • Desmosomal Hotspots, Microtubule Delivery, and Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    • Robin M. Shaw
    Microtubules can target proteins such as Connexin43 to plasma membrane subdomains. Patel et al. (2014) now show that the structural desmosome complex participates in targeted trafficking of membrane components through interactions between the microtubule network and the N terminus of desmoplakin, a region that is a pathogenic mutation hotspot.
  • Outside In: Inversion of Cell Polarity Controls Epithelial Lumen Formation

    • George E. Davis,
    • Ondine B. Cleaver
    Establishment of cell polarity is important for epithelial lumen formation, and the molecular mechanisms directing this process are only partially understood. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Bryant et al. (2014) show that disassembly, membrane translocation, and reassembly of podocalyxin complexes controls epithelial cell polarization and lumen formation in 3D matrices.
  • Multigenerational Chromatin Marks: No Enzymes Need Apply

    • William G. Kelly
    Epigenetic memory stably maintains and transmits information during genome replication. Recently in Science, Gaydos et al. (2014) show that repressive chromatin marks exhibit transgenerational stability in the absence of chromatin-modifying enzymes in Caenorhabditis elegans, in contrast to work in flies suggesting that such proteins mediate stable inheritance of epigenetic modifications.

Articles

  • The C. elegans SNAPc Component SNPC-4 Coats piRNA Domains and Is Globally Required for piRNA Abundance

    • Dionna M. Kasper,
    • Guilin Wang,
    • Kathryn E. Gardner,
    • Timothy G. Johnstone,
    • Valerie Reinke
    C. elegans type I piRNA genes are located in evolutionarily conserved genomic clusters, despite being independent transcription units. Here, Kasper et al. demonstrate that the sequence-specific transcription factor SNPC-4 binds and coats entire piRNA domains and promotes piRNA expression through a germline-specific interaction with the early piRNA biogenesis factor PRDE-1.
  • A Mechanical Jack-like Mechanism Drives Spontaneous Fracture Healing in Neonatal Mice

    • Chagai Rot,
    • Tomer Stern,
    • Ronen Blecher,
    • Ben Friesem,
    • Elazar Zelzer
    Unstabilized humeral fractures induced in newborn mice exhibited rapid realignment of initially angulated bones. Surprisingly, realignment involved substantial fragment movement, driven by a jack-like mechanism of opposing forces generated by a bidirectional growth plate forming at the fracture site. Blocking muscle contraction led to premature callus ossification and failed reduction.
  • A Molecular Switch for the Orientation of Epithelial Cell Polarization

    • David M. Bryant,
    • Julie Roignot,
    • Anirban Datta,
    • Arend W. Overeem,
    • Minji Kim,
    • Wei Yu,
    • Xiao Peng,
    • Dennis J. Eastburn,
    • Andrew J. Ewald,
    • Zena Werb,
    • Keith E. Mostov
    Bryant et al. uncover a pathway controlling apical-basal polarity orientation in 3D culture. Beta1-integrins sense ECM to control the spatiotemporal RhoA activity. Inappropriate RhoA activity at the ECM interface causes stabilization of apical proteins at the ECM interface and collective front-rear polarity, rather than forming a lumen in 3D culture.
  • Cell Intrinsic Modulation of Wnt Signaling Controls Neuroblast Migration in C. elegans

    • Remco A. Mentink,
    • Teije C. Middelkoop,
    • Lorenzo Rella,
    • Ni Ji,
    • Chung Yin Tang,
    • Marco C. Betist,
    • Alexander van Oudenaarden,
    • Hendrik C. Korswagen
    Mentink et al. uncover a cell-intrinsic timing mechanism in cell migration. They show that the Wnt-dependent migration of the C. elegans QR neuroblast descendants is mediated by three sequentially acting Wnt signaling pathways. The transition between these pathways depends on the temporal regulation of Wnt receptor expression.
  • Antioxidant Signaling Involving the Microtubule Motor KIF12 Is an Intracellular Target of Nutrition Excess in Beta Cells

    • Wenxing Yang,
    • Yosuke Tanaka,
    • Miki Bundo,
    • Nobutaka Hirokawa
    Yang et al. find that, in pancreatic beta cells, KIF12 kinesin acts as a scaffold for the antioxidant transcription factor Sp1, enhancing peroxisomal biogenesis through Hsc70 transcription. Disruptions of this mechanism are seen in lipotoxicity in diabetes.
  • Cofilin-2 Controls Actin Filament Length in Muscle Sarcomeres

    • Elena Kremneva,
    • Maarit H. Makkonen,
    • Aneta Skwarek-Maruszewska,
    • Gergana Gateva,
    • Alphee Michelot,
    • Roberto Dominguez,
    • Pekka Lappalainen
    Generation of contractile force in skeletal muscles relies on careful regulation of actin dynamics. Kremneva et al. identify unique features of cofilin-2, a muscle-specific isoform of the actin binding protein, that allow it to efficiently disassemble both ATP- and ADP-Pi-actin filaments to regulate their length in cardiac muscle sarcomeres.

Resource

Short Articles

Advertisement
Advertisement