Advertisement
Developmental Cell
This journal offers authors two options (open access or subscription) to publish research

Nov 10, 2014

Volume 31Issue 3p257-382
Open Archive
On the cover: A section of normal fetal mouse heart and lungs (at E18, 1 day before birth) stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Mutations affecting cilia can impact heart and lung development. For more information about IFT27's function within cilia, linking retrograde IFT particles to the BBSome, and thus promoting BBSome trafficking out of cilia, see Liew et al., pp. 265–278, and Eguether et al., pp. 279–290. Image courtesy of Jovenal T. San Agustin and Gregory J. Pazour....
On the cover: A section of normal fetal mouse heart and lungs (at E18, 1 day before birth) stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Mutations affecting cilia can impact heart and lung development. For more information about IFT27's function within cilia, linking retrograde IFT particles to the BBSome, and thus promoting BBSome trafficking out of cilia, see Liew et al., pp. 265–278, and Eguether et al., pp. 279–290. Image courtesy of Jovenal T. San Agustin and Gregory J. Pazour.

Previews

  • As Time Goes by: KRABs Evolve to KAP Endogenous Retroelements

    • Michael Imbeault,
    • Didier Trono
    Retroelements, constituting about 50% of the human genome, both contribute to its evolution and threaten its integrity and are thus silenced during development. Jacobs et al. (2014) identify sequence-specific KRAB-ZNF proteins that repress subsets of L1 and SVA retrotransposons in humans, highlighting the evolutionary interplay between retroelements and their hosts.
  • RUVs Drive Chromosome Decondensation after Mitosis

    • Magdalena Strzelecka,
    • Rebecca Heald
    Condensation of chromosomes during mitosis is required for their segregation into daughter cells but must be reversed to allow for postmitotic functions. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Magalska et al. (2014) show that the ATPases RuvBL1/2 drive postmitotic chromatin decondensation, demonstrating that this is an active process.
  • A Competitive Cell Fate Switch

    • Arnaldo Carreira-Rosario,
    • Michael Buszczak
    Whereas tissue development and homeostasis depend on stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, the mechanisms that balance these processes remain incompletely understood. Pan et al. (2014) now show that competitive protein-protein interactions between Bam and COP9 signalosome components regulate cell fate decisions within the Drosophila ovarian germline stem cell lineage.
  • Dissecting Intraflagellar Transport, One Molecule at a Time

    • Erica E. Davis,
    • Nicholas Katsanis
    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for proper function of cilia, although many of the mechanistic details underlying this process are obscure. Two studies in this issue of Developmental Cell illuminate key functions of one IFT protein, IFT27, and offer clues into how IFT cargo is selected and transported.

Articles

  • The Intraflagellar Transport Protein IFT27 Promotes BBSome Exit from Cilia through the GTPase ARL6/BBS3

    • Gerald M. Liew,
    • Fan Ye,
    • Andrew R. Nager,
    • J. Patrick Murphy,
    • Jaclyn S. Lee,
    • Mike Aguiar,
    • David K. Breslow,
    • Steven P. Gygi,
    • Maxence V. Nachury
    The Arf-like GTPase ARL6 triggers BBSome coat assembly and cargo entry into cilia. Now, Liew et al. find that the Rab-like GTPase IFT27 disengages from anterograde IFT complexes to bind and activate nucleotide-empty ARL6 and thereby promote the exit of the BBSome and its associated cargoes from cilia.
  • IFT27 Links the BBSome to IFT for Maintenance of the Ciliary Signaling Compartment

    • Thibaut Eguether,
    • Jovenal T. San Agustin,
    • Brian T. Keady,
    • Julie A. Jonassen,
    • Yinwen Liang,
    • Richard Francis,
    • Kimimasa Tobita,
    • Colin A. Johnson,
    • Zakia A. Abdelhamed,
    • Cecilia W. Lo,
    • Gregory J. Pazour
    In vertebrates, hedgehog signaling is organized in the cilium, and ciliary defects affect signaling. Eguether et al. find that intraflagellar transport proteins IFT25 and IFT27 are not required for ciliary assembly but couple ciliary trafficking of hedgehog signaling components to the IFT particle through the BBSome and BBSome regulator Lztfl1.
  • The Conserved Misshapen-Warts-Yorkie Pathway Acts in Enteroblasts to Regulate Intestinal Stem Cells in Drosophila

    • Qi Li,
    • Shuangxi Li,
    • Sebastian Mana-Capelli,
    • Rachel J. Roth Flach,
    • Laura V. Danai,
    • Alla Amcheslavsky,
    • Yingchao Nie,
    • Satoshi Kaneko,
    • Xiaohao Yao,
    • Xiaochu Chen,
    • Jennifer L. Cotton,
    • Junhao Mao,
    • Dannel McCollum,
    • Jin Jiang,
    • Michael P. Czech,
    • Lan Xu,
    • Y. Tony Ip
    Li et al. show that the Ste20-like protein kinase Misshapen acts in differentiating adult Drosophila enteroblasts to control nearby intestinal stem cell division. This function is mediated by a conserved signaling pathway in which Misshapen and its mammalian homolog MAP4K4 replace Hippo/Mst kinases in the regulation of transcriptional coactivator Yorkie/YAP.
  • RuvB-like ATPases Function in Chromatin Decondensation at the End of Mitosis

    • Adriana Magalska,
    • Anna Katharina Schellhaus,
    • Daniel Moreno-Andrés,
    • Fabio Zanini,
    • Allana Schooley,
    • Ruchika Sachdev,
    • Heinz Schwarz,
    • Johannes Madlung,
    • Wolfram Antonin
    How mitotic chromosomes decondense to establish functional interphase chromatin at the end of mitosis remains ill defined. Using a cell-free system that recapitulates chromatin decondensation in vitro, Magalska et al. identify RuvB-like ATPases as crucial decondensation factors, demonstrating that decondensation is an active process with dedicated molecular machinery.
  • B-LINK: A Hemicentin, Plakin, and Integrin-Dependent Adhesion System that Links Tissues by Connecting Adjacent Basement Membranes

    • Meghan A. Morrissey,
    • Daniel P. Keeley,
    • Elliott J. Hagedorn,
    • Shelly T.H. McClatchey,
    • Qiuyi Chi,
    • David H. Hall,
    • David R. Sherwood
    Although they often separate tissues, basement membranes sometimes connect to link adjacent tissues. Morrissey et al. identify an adhesion system, B-LINK, which utilizes the extracellular matrix protein hemicentin, the cytolinker plakin, and integrin to attach the uterine and vulval tissues through adjacent basement membranes during C. elegans development.
  • SRF Regulates Craniofacial Development through Selective Recruitment of MRTF Cofactors by PDGF Signaling

    • Harish N. Vasudevan,
    • Philippe Soriano
    PDGF and FGF signaling both play a role in craniofacial development. Vasudevan and Soriano show that SRF, a downstream effector in both pathways, activates a distinct set of genes in response to each growth factor due to selective interactions with MRTF and TCF cofactors.
  • HAND2 Targets Define a Network of Transcriptional Regulators that Compartmentalize the Early Limb Bud Mesenchyme

    • Marco Osterwalder,
    • Dario Speziale,
    • Malak Shoukry,
    • Rajiv Mohan,
    • Robert Ivanek,
    • Manuel Kohler,
    • Christian Beisel,
    • Xiaohui Wen,
    • Suzie J. Scales,
    • Vincent M. Christoffels,
    • Axel Visel,
    • Javier Lopez-Rios,
    • Rolf Zeller
    Hand2 and Gli3 polarize the anterior-posterior (AP) limb bud axis upstream of SHH. Osterwalder et al. uncover the underlying transcriptional circuits using an epitope-tagged Hand2 allele for ChIP-seq analysis. The network of HAND2 target transcription factors establishes not only AP polarity but also proximal identities in the nascent limb bud mesenchyme.

Resource

  • Toward a Comprehensive Map of the Effectors of Rab GTPases

    • Alison K. Gillingham,
    • Rita Sinka,
    • Isabel L. Torres,
    • Kathryn S. Lilley,
    • Sean Munro
    Rab GTPases organize cellular compartments by recruiting specific effectors to organelle membranes. This paper describes affinity chromatography using all Drosophila Rabs with a mammalian ortholog. The Rab interactors found include known effectors, tethering complexes, coiled-coil proteins, motor proteins, proteins of unknown function, and several proteins linked to human disease.

Short Article

Advertisement
Advertisement