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Developmental Cell
This journal offers authors two options (open access or subscription) to publish research

Nov 24, 2014

Volume 31Issue 4p383-512
Open Archive
On the cover: Immunofluorescence microscopy image of a chinmo mutant adult Drosophila testis with feminized somatic cells surrounding the arrested male germ cells. The image is stained with markers for germ cells (Vasa in red), somatic membrane (Armadillo in green), fusome (1B1 in green), and DNA (DAPI in blue). For more information on how STAT/chinmo signaling provides the continuous input to adult stem cells that is needed to maintain their sex throughout life, see Ma et al., pp. 474–486....
On the cover: Immunofluorescence microscopy image of a chinmo mutant adult Drosophila testis with feminized somatic cells surrounding the arrested male germ cells. The image is stained with markers for germ cells (Vasa in red), somatic membrane (Armadillo in green), fusome (1B1 in green), and DNA (DAPI in blue). For more information on how STAT/chinmo signaling provides the continuous input to adult stem cells that is needed to maintain their sex throughout life, see Ma et al., pp. 474–486.

Editorial

  • Credibility and Reproducibility

    • Emilie Marcus
    Credibility is everything for science, and it is built over time in both obvious and subtle ways. It is how we interact with colleagues and collaborators. It is how generously and openly we share reagents and how we mentor students and postdocs. It is how we review each other’s papers, and it is how we credit others’ work. It is the way we educate and inform the public that funds us. It is the way we document and store our data. And it is the rigor, transparency, and attention we invest in designing, conducting, and reporting experiments.

Previews

  • chinmo Mutant Fly Testis Stem Cells Switching Sex Farewell to Maleness

    • David Zarkower
    Maintaining cellular identity is crucial for homeostasis, and sexual fates of vertebrate testis and ovary cells require continual reinforcement. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Ma et al. (2014) provide insights into stem cell fate maintenance in Drosophila, finding that the JAK/STAT target chinmo prevents transformation of testis somatic stem cells into their ovarian counterparts.
  • Arrested Detachment: A DEPDC1B-Mediated De-adhesion Mitotic Checkpoint

    • Rafael Garcia-Mata
    Mitotic cell rounding is accompanied by changes in the actin cytoskeleton, de-adhesion, and an increase in cortical rigidity. In this issue, Marchesi et al. (2014) describe an adhesion-dependent mitotic checkpoint and identify DEPDC1B as the factor responsible for coordinating de-adhesion with the ability of cells to enter mitosis.
  • HORMA Domains at the Heart of Meiotic Chromosome Dynamics

    • Gerben Vader,
    • Andrea Musacchio
    HORMA domain proteins are required for the careful orchestration of chromosomal organization during meiosis. Kim et al. (2014) and Silva et al. (2014) now provide structural and functional insights into the roles of C. elegans HORMA proteins, revealing parallels to the function of the HORMA protein MAD2 in mitotic checkpoint signaling.
  • A Longer Life for Yeast with Good Memory

    • Roland Wedlich-Söldner
    Cell polarity establishment has been studied in great detail, but much less is known about mechanisms that prevent polarization. Reporting recently in Cell, Meitinger et al. (2014) identify an elaborate mechanism in yeast cells that efficiently inhibits Cdc42 activation in cytokinesis remnants. Failure of this “anti-polarization” memory increases replicative aging.

Articles

  • RanBP1 Governs Spindle Assembly by Defining Mitotic Ran-GTP Production

    • Michael Shaofei Zhang,
    • Alexei Arnaoutov,
    • Mary Dasso
    Ran-GTP production by RCC1 promotes mitotic spindle assembly. Using Xenopus egg extracts, Zhang et al. show that RanBP1 specifically sequesters and inhibits cytosolic RCC1 in mitosis, restricting RCC1’s activity to the chromatin-bound pool. This mechanism controls the chromatin binding dynamics of RCC1 and shapes Ran-GTP gradients that guide spindle formation.
  • Structural Insights into the Organization of the Cavin Membrane Coat Complex

    • Oleksiy Kovtun,
    • Vikas A. Tillu,
    • WooRam Jung,
    • Natalya Leneva,
    • Nicholas Ariotti,
    • Natasha Chaudhary,
    • Ramya A. Mandyam,
    • Charles Ferguson,
    • Garry P. Morgan,
    • Wayne A. Johnston,
    • Stephen J. Harrop,
    • Kirill Alexandrov,
    • Robert G. Parton,
    • Brett M. Collins
    Cavins are required for the formation of membrane invaginations called caveolae. Kovtun et al. show that the mammalian cavin proteins self-assemble via formation of a trimeric coiled-coil structure. Cavins are found to have a rod-shaped architecture that polymerizes and associates with membranes to form the characteristic caveolar protein coat.
  • DEPDC1B Coordinates De-adhesion Events and Cell-Cycle Progression at Mitosis

    • Stefano Marchesi,
    • Francesca Montani,
    • Gianluca Deflorian,
    • Rocco D’Antuono,
    • Alessandro Cuomo,
    • Serena Bologna,
    • Carmela Mazzoccoli,
    • Tiziana Bonaldi,
    • Pier Paolo Di Fiore,
    • Francesco Nicassio
    During mitosis, cells become rounded and lose attachment to the substrate. Marchesi et al. show that DEPDC1B, a cell-cycle-regulated protein, binds to the focal-adhesion-associated receptor PTPRF, thus inhibiting RhoA activation and leading to dismantling of focal adhesions upon mitotic entry. DEPDC1B thus links mitotic progression to de-adhesion.
  • Eya1 Interacts with Six2 and Myc to Regulate Expansion of the Nephron Progenitor Pool during Nephrogenesis

    • Jinshu Xu,
    • Elaine Y.M. Wong,
    • Chunming Cheng,
    • Jun Li,
    • Mohammad T.K. Sharkar,
    • Chelsea Y. Xu,
    • Binglai Chen,
    • Jianbo Sun,
    • Dongzhu Jing,
    • Pin-Xian Xu
    Eya nuclear phosphatases collaborate with Six family transcription factors to control gene expression. Xu et al. find that Six2 enhances nuclear localization of Eya1, which, in turn, dephosphorylates Myc transcription factors. The resulting stabilization of Myc contributes to Eya1/Six2 effects on nephron progenitor proliferation.
  • A Predictive Model of Bifunctional Transcription Factor Signaling during Embryonic Tissue Patterning

    • Jan Philipp Junker,
    • Kevin A. Peterson,
    • Yuichi Nishi,
    • Junhao Mao,
    • Andrew P. McMahon,
    • Alexander van Oudenaarden
    Junker et al. develop a reductionist model for gene regulation by the bifunctional Gli transcription factors, which act as activators or repressors, depending on hedgehog levels. By combining this model with quantitative measurements of transcriptional readouts of the pathway, they infer Gli activator and repressor gradients in the neural tube.
  • The PI3K Class III Complex Promotes Axon Pruning by Downregulating a Ptc-Derived Signal via Endosome-Lysosomal Degradation

    • Noa Issman-Zecharya,
    • Oren Schuldiner
    Issman-Zecharya and Schuldiner find that the endolysosomal pathway is required for developmental axon pruning of mushroom body neurons. The PI3K class III complex is required to downregulate a Patched-derived signal via endolysosomal degradation. Interestingly, it seems that the Patched-derived signal that inhibits pruning is independent of Smoothened and Hedgehog.
  • The Jak-STAT Target Chinmo Prevents Sex Transformation of Adult Stem Cells in the Drosophila Testis Niche

    • Qing Ma,
    • Matthew Wawersik,
    • Erika L. Matunis
    The transcription factor Chinmo promotes renewal of somatic stem cells in the Drosophila testis. Ma et al. find that loss of Chinmo leads to feminization of the stem cells, partly through loss of the sex determinant Doublesex, suggesting that sexual identity must be continually maintained in the adult testis.
  • The Chromosome Axis Controls Meiotic Events through a Hierarchical Assembly of HORMA Domain Proteins

    • Yumi Kim,
    • Scott C. Rosenberg,
    • Christine L. Kugel,
    • Nora Kostow,
    • Ofer Rog,
    • Vitaliy Davydov,
    • Tiffany Y. Su,
    • Abby F. Dernburg,
    • Kevin D. Corbett
    Kim, Rosenberg, et al. find that the meiotic HORMA domain proteins in C. elegans assemble into complexes along the chromosome axis through head-to-tail binding interactions, which are likely conserved throughout eukaryotes. Hierarchical assembly of HORMA proteins underlies chromosome axis structure and is important for meiotic recombination and chromosome segregation.

Short Article

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