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Developmental Cell
This journal offers authors two options (open access or subscription) to publish research

Mar 27, 2017

Volume 40Issue 6p513-618
Open Archive
On the cover: In Chinese myth, the world was created from the splitting of a cosmic egg into heaven and earth. The giant Pangu ensured their separation by pushing them apart. In this artistic representation, the super elongation complex (SEC, Pangu) translates the initial small differential Notch activity between a neural stem cell (NSC, earth) and its sibling neural progenitor (heaven) into ultimate, differential cell fate outcomes. The SEC thus acts as a fate “amplifier” by forming a self-reinforcing positive feedback loop (clouds) with Notch signaling within the NSC (earth). To learn more about this role for the SEC, see Liu et al., pp. 537–551. Art by Zhi Ye....
On the cover: In Chinese myth, the world was created from the splitting of a cosmic egg into heaven and earth. The giant Pangu ensured their separation by pushing them apart. In this artistic representation, the super elongation complex (SEC, Pangu) translates the initial small differential Notch activity between a neural stem cell (NSC, earth) and its sibling neural progenitor (heaven) into ultimate, differential cell fate outcomes. The SEC thus acts as a fate “amplifier” by forming a self-reinforcing positive feedback loop (clouds) with Notch signaling within the NSC (earth). To learn more about this role for the SEC, see Liu et al., pp. 537–551. Art by Zhi Ye.

Previews

  • Asymmetric Notch Amplification to Secure Stem Cell Identity

    • Anthony M. Rossi,
    • Claude Desplan
    Stem cells self-renew and produce progenitors with limited proliferative potential. Reporting in Developmental Cell, Liu et al. (2017) demonstrate that in some neural stem cells, Notch activity is asymmetrically amplified by a positive feedback loop with the super elongation complex (SEC) to quickly differentiate between stem cells and progenitors.
  • MicroRNAs Make a Difference in Cardiovascular Robustness

    • Rachael Bakker,
    • Richard W. Carthew
    Invertebrate microRNAs (miRNAs) can suppress developmental variability that is caused by environmental and genetic variation. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Kasper et al. (2017) show that zebrafish miRNAs suppress variability in cardiovascular development during embryogenesis, providing insight into the conserved link between miRNAs and robustness.
  • Pushing Yap into the Nucleus with Shear Force

    • Jason Kuan Han Lai,
    • Didier Y.R. Stainier
    Endothelial cells line blood vessels and experience shear stress from blood flow. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Nakajima and colleagues (2017) show that in zebrafish Yap responds to blood flow by translocating into the nucleus, where it drives a genetic program to maintain vascular stability.
  • Autophagy: It’s in Your Blood

    • Sergei Doulatov,
    • George Q. Daley
    Autophagy, a central pathway for cellular homeostasis, plays diverse roles in development, cancer, aging, and neurodegeneration. In a new report in Nature, Ho et al. (2017) show that autophagy is essential for maintaining the replicative quiescence of hematopoietic stem cells throughout life by limiting the number of active mitochondria.
  • Macrophages Help Cells Connect to Pattern Zebrafish Stripes

    • Thomas B. Kornberg
    Mechanisms that disseminate the proteins that orchestrate organ and tissue development have been a major focus of cell and developmental biology. Reporting in Science, Eom and Parichy (2017) characterize the role that macrophages play in facilitating long-distance signaling between the cells that make stripes in the adult zebrafish.

Articles

  • Flow-Dependent Endothelial YAP Regulation Contributes to Vessel Maintenance

    • Hiroyuki Nakajima,
    • Kimiko Yamamoto,
    • Sobhika Agarwala,
    • Kenta Terai,
    • Hajime Fukui,
    • Shigetomo Fukuhara,
    • Koji Ando,
    • Takahiro Miyazaki,
    • Yasuhiro Yokota,
    • Etienne Schmelzer,
    • Heinz-Georg Belting,
    • Markus Affolter,
    • Virginie Lecaudey,
    • Naoki Mochizuki
    Nakajima et al. monitor the spatiotemporal localization and transcriptional activity of Yap1 in ECs of living zebrafish and reveal that blood flow regulates localization of Yap1 through mechanotransduction signaling.
  • The Super Elongation Complex Drives Neural Stem Cell Fate Commitment

    • Kun Liu,
    • Dan Shen,
    • Jingwen Shen,
    • Shihong M. Gao,
    • Bo Li,
    • Chouin Wong,
    • Weidong Feng,
    • Yan Song
    Liu et al. implicate the super elongation complex (SEC), best known for transcription elongation checkpoint control, in driving Drosophila neural stem cell (NSC) fate commitment. SEC is highly expressed in NSCs, where it interacts directly with the Notch signaling pathway in a self-reinforcing feedback loop for timely stem cell fate lock-in.
  • MicroRNAs Establish Uniform Traits during the Architecture of Vertebrate Embryos

    • Dionna M. Kasper,
    • Albertomaria Moro,
    • Emma Ristori,
    • Anand Narayanan,
    • Guillermina Hill-Teran,
    • Elizabeth Fleming,
    • Miguel Moreno-Mateos,
    • Charles E. Vejnar,
    • Jing Zhang,
    • Donghoon Lee,
    • Mengting Gu,
    • Mark Gerstein,
    • Antonio Giraldez,
    • Stefania Nicoli
    Phenotypic diversity must be controlled to ensure balance between trait functionality and trait adaptability to changing environments. Kasper et al. establish that specific miRNAs limit phenotypic variation of the vascular system in a vertebrate embryo. Altered phenotypic variability resulting from miRNA loss sensitizes blood vessels to diverse environmental stresses.
  • miR-219 Cooperates with miR-338 in Myelination and Promotes Myelin Repair in the CNS

    • Haibo Wang,
    • Ana Lis Moyano,
    • Zhangyan Ma,
    • Yaqi Deng,
    • Yifeng Lin,
    • Chuntao Zhao,
    • Liguo Zhang,
    • Minqing Jiang,
    • Xuelian He,
    • Zhixing Ma,
    • Fanghui Lu,
    • Mei Xin,
    • Wenhao Zhou,
    • Sung Ok Yoon,
    • Ernesto R. Bongarzone,
    • Q. Richard Lu
    Wang et al. show that miR-219 collaborates with miR-338 and is required for proper oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the mammalian CNS by targeting a network of stage-specific differentiation inhibitors, including Lingo1 and Etv5. Therapeutic delivery of miR-219 also enhances myelin repair in animal models of multiple sclerosis.
  • The Putative Drp1 Inhibitor mdivi-1 Is a Reversible Mitochondrial Complex I Inhibitor that Modulates Reactive Oxygen Species

    • Evan A. Bordt,
    • Pascaline Clerc,
    • Brian A. Roelofs,
    • Andrew J. Saladino,
    • László Tretter,
    • Vera Adam-Vizi,
    • Edward Cherok,
    • Ahmed Khalil,
    • Nagendra Yadava,
    • Shealinna X. Ge,
    • T. Chase Francis,
    • Nolan W. Kennedy,
    • Lora K. Picton,
    • Tanya Kumar,
    • Sruti Uppuluri,
    • Alexandrea M. Miller,
    • Kie Itoh,
    • Mariusz Karbowski,
    • Hiromi Sesaki,
    • R. Blake Hill,
    • Brian M. Polster
    Bordt, Clerc et al. show that the putative Drp1 inhibitor mdivi-1 reversibly inhibits mitochondrial complex I without impairing Drp1 GTPase activity or lengthening mitochondria. mdivi-1 attenuates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production under conditions relevant to ischemia/reperfusion injury. These mechanisms may provide an alternative explanation for some of mdivi-1's in vivo effects.
  • Foxh1 Occupies cis-Regulatory Modules Prior to Dynamic Transcription Factor Interactions Controlling the Mesendoderm Gene Program

    • Rebekah M. Charney,
    • Elmira Forouzmand,
    • Jin Sun Cho,
    • Jessica Cheung,
    • Kitt D. Paraiso,
    • Yuuri Yasuoka,
    • Shuji Takahashi,
    • Masanori Taira,
    • Ira L. Blitz,
    • Xiaohui Xie,
    • Ken W.Y. Cho
    How maternal transcription factors control the onset of gene regulatory networks in the early embryo is poorly understood. Charney et al. demonstrate dynamic binding of maternal Foxh1 to the embryonic genome well before zygotic gene activation. They elucidate the temporal recruitment of co-factors to cis-regulatory modules controlling mesendoderm specification.

Short Article

  • Serum Proteases Potentiate BMP-Induced Cell Cycle Re-entry of Dedifferentiating Muscle Cells during Newt Limb Regeneration

    • Ines Wagner,
    • Heng Wang,
    • Philipp M. Weissert,
    • Werner L. Straube,
    • Anna Shevchenko,
    • Marc Gentzel,
    • Goncalo Brito,
    • Akira Tazaki,
    • Catarina Oliveira,
    • Takuji Sugiura,
    • Andrej Shevchenko,
    • András Simon,
    • David N. Drechsel,
    • Elly M. Tanaka
    In the newt, limb regeneration starts with local blood clotting and requires myofibers to dedifferentiate and re-enter the cell cycle to make proliferative myogenic precursors. Wagner et al. show that blood clotting proteases cleave and activate blood-derived BMPs to promote BMP signaling-dependent cell cycle re-entry for myofiber dedifferentiation.
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