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Developmental Cell
This journal offers authors two options (open access or subscription) to publish research

Mar 26, 2018

Volume 44Issue 6p653-770
Open Archive
On the cover: The fly gut is represented by a collection of traditional Japanese sweets composed of sugar and starch but with low amino acid content. Under low methionine input, intestinal stem cell (purple cylindrical candy) halts protein synthesis and cell division via reduction of a methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine. At the same time, enterocytes (pink sugar flower) secrete cytokines (golden sugar plums) to prime the intestinal stem cell for cell division. To learn more, see Obata et al., pp. 741–751. Cover photograph by Kayoko T. Sakurai....
On the cover: The fly gut is represented by a collection of traditional Japanese sweets composed of sugar and starch but with low amino acid content. Under low methionine input, intestinal stem cell (purple cylindrical candy) halts protein synthesis and cell division via reduction of a methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine. At the same time, enterocytes (pink sugar flower) secrete cytokines (golden sugar plums) to prime the intestinal stem cell for cell division. To learn more, see Obata et al., pp. 741–751. Cover photograph by Kayoko T. Sakurai.

Previews

  • Basal Cells in Lung Development and Repair

    • Edward E. Morrisey
    Basal cells are an important stem cell lineage in many tissues, including the lung. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Yang et. al. (2018) find that basal cells emerge very early in lung development and that a subset of these contributes to the expansive epithelial wound response observed after influenza injury.
  • Quality before Quantity: Inspecting CFTR

    • Hongmei Mou
    CFTR biosynthesis is highly dynamic. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Okiyoneda et al. (2018) show that RFFL serves as a CFTR conformation scrutinizer at the plasma membrane. It recognizes misfolded CFTR proteins and marks them for degradation. This quality control mechanism may be explored to benefit cystic fibrosis patients.
  • piRNA Rules of Engagement

    • Joshua M. Svendsen,
    • Taiowa A. Montgomery
    piRNAs are known to silence transposable elements, but not all piRNAs match transposon sequences. Recent studies from Shen et al. (2018) and Zhang et al. (2018) identify rules for piRNA target recognition in Caenorhabditis elegans. Permissive pairing rules allow targeting of essentially all germline mRNAs, while protective mechanisms prevent silencing self-genes.

Commentary

  • Exploring the Function of Dynamic Phosphorylation-Dephosphorylation Cycles

    • Lendert Gelens,
    • Adrian T. Saurin
    Protein phosphorylation is a dynamic post-translational modification critical for biological responses. At the level of individual molecules, phosphorylation dynamics can have important functional implications, but this information is rarely quantified. We discuss how rapid phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles could underlie important signaling properties, including the ability to rapidly bind and release proteins.

Articles

  • Pericyte ALK5/TIMP3 Axis Contributes to Endothelial Morphogenesis in the Developing Brain

    • Jui M. Dave,
    • Teodelinda Mirabella,
    • Scott D. Weatherbee,
    • Daniel M. Greif
    Dave et al. demonstrate that Pdgfrb-Cre, Alk5(flox/flox) embryos (mutants) have deleterious non-cell autonomous effects on endothelial cells and germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH). Mutant vessels display abnormal dilation, reduced pericyte coverage, endothelial hyperproliferation, reduced collagen, and enhanced matrix metalloproteinase activity. ALK5-depleted pericytes downregulate TIMP3, and TIMP3 administration attenuates GMH in mutants.
  • Developmental History Provides a Roadmap for the Emergence of Tumor Plasticity

    • Purushothama Rao Tata,
    • Ryan D. Chow,
    • Srinivas Vinod Saladi,
    • Aleksandra Tata,
    • Arvind Konkimalla,
    • Anne Bara,
    • Daniel Montoro,
    • Lida P. Hariri,
    • Angela R. Shih,
    • Mari Mino-Kenudson,
    • Hongmei Mou,
    • Shioko Kimura,
    • Leif W. Ellisen,
    • Jayaraj Rajagopal
    Many tumors are characterized by the loss or gain of transcription factors that govern embryonic cell-fate specification. Tata, Chow et al. show that elements of pathologic tumor plasticity mirror the developmental history of organs in that plastic cancer cells can acquire cell fates normally associated with developmentally related neighboring organs.
  • Chaperone-Independent Peripheral Quality Control of CFTR by RFFL E3 Ligase

    • Tsukasa Okiyoneda,
    • Guido Veit,
    • Ryohei Sakai,
    • Misaki Aki,
    • Takeshi Fujihara,
    • Momoko Higashi,
    • Seiko Susuki-Miyata,
    • Masanori Miyata,
    • Norihito Fukuda,
    • Akihiko Yoshida,
    • Haijin Xu,
    • Pirjo M. Apaja,
    • Gergely L. Lukacs
    Okiyoneda et al. investigate how ubiquitination targets ΔF508-CFTR, the most common CFTR mutant found in cystic fibrosis, at the cell surface. The authors show that RFFL, a ubiquitin ligase that directly and selectively recognizes unfolded ΔF508-CFTR through its disordered regions, promotes K63-linked poly-ubiquitination of CFTR to stimulate lysosomal degradation.
  • Opposing Effects of CREBBP Mutations Govern the Phenotype of Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome and Adult SHH Medulloblastoma

    • Daniel J. Merk,
    • Jasmin Ohli,
    • Natalie D. Merk,
    • Venu Thatikonda,
    • Sorana Morrissy,
    • Melanie Schoof,
    • Susanne N. Schmid,
    • Luke Harrison,
    • Severin Filser,
    • Julia Ahlfeld,
    • Serap Erkek,
    • Kaamini Raithatha,
    • Thomas Andreska,
    • Marc Weißhaar,
    • Michael Launspach,
    • Julia E. Neumann,
    • Mehdi Shakarami,
    • Dennis Plenker,
    • Marco A. Marra,
    • Yisu Li,
    • Andrew J. Mungall,
    • Richard A. Moore,
    • Yussanne Ma,
    • Steven J.M. Jones,
    • Beat Lutz,
    • Birgit Ertl-Wagner,
    • Andrea Rossi,
    • Rabea Wagener,
    • Reiner Siebert,
    • Andreas Jung,
    • Charles G. Eberhart,
    • Boleslaw Lach,
    • Michael Sendtner,
    • Stefan M. Pfister,
    • Michael D. Taylor,
    • Lukas Chavez,
    • Marcel Kool,
    • Ulrich Schüller
    Merk et al. show that the developmental time frame of CREBBP mutation acquisition in cerebellar granule neurons determines the pathogenic effect of these alterations in the cerebellum. These time-sensitive consequences explain phenotypic differences seen in patients with germline (Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome) or somatic mutations (adult SHH medulloblastoma) of CREBBP.
  • A Golgi Lipid Signaling Pathway Controls Apical Golgi Distribution and Cell Polarity during Neurogenesis

    • Zhigang Xie,
    • Seong Kwon Hur,
    • Liang Zhao,
    • Charles S. Abrams,
    • Vytas A. Bankaitis
    Xie et al. describe a cell-autonomous phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate-dependent pathway essential for neocortex development that regulates neural stem cell function by loading the Golgi network into the cellular apical compartment. The circuit involves two lipid transfer proteins (PITPNA/PITPNB) that potentiate phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate synthesis, and GOLPH3 and CERT as effectors of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate signaling.
  • Nutritional Control of Stem Cell Division through S-Adenosylmethionine in Drosophila Intestine

    • Fumiaki Obata,
    • Kayoko Tsuda-Sakurai,
    • Takahiro Yamazaki,
    • Ryo Nishio,
    • Kei Nishimura,
    • Masaki Kimura,
    • Masabumi Funakoshi,
    • Masayuki Miura
    Obata et al. reveal that S-adenosylmethionine controls intestinal stem cell activity via regulation of protein synthesis. They also demonstrate that this amino acid metabolite mediates the starvation response, fine-tuning gut homeostasis in response to different dietary conditions.

Short Articles

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