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Developmental Cell
This journal offers authors two options (open access or subscription) to publish research

Jul 12, 2021

Volume 56Issue 13p1819-2006
Open Archive
On the cover: Cellular microenvironments influence diverse properties and functions of cells. The cover image depicts the nurturing relationship between Leptin Receptor+ (LepR+) stromal cells, endothelial cells, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and progenitor cells in the bone marrow microenvironment, represented by a bird feeding her young, which are protected inside the nest. To learn more about our current understanding of HSCs and progenitor cell niches, see the review in this focus issue by Comazzetto et al. (pp. 1848–1860). The cover image was conceived by Stefano Comazzetto and designed by Katie Regan....
On the cover: Cellular microenvironments influence diverse properties and functions of cells. The cover image depicts the nurturing relationship between Leptin Receptor+ (LepR+) stromal cells, endothelial cells, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and progenitor cells in the bone marrow microenvironment, represented by a bird feeding her young, which are protected inside the nest. To learn more about our current understanding of HSCs and progenitor cell niches, see the review in this focus issue by Comazzetto et al. (pp. 1848–1860). The cover image was conceived by Stefano Comazzetto and designed by Katie Regan.

Editorial

Reviews

  • Microenvironmental interactions of oligodendroglial cells

    • Belgin Yalçın,
    • Michelle Monje
    Yalçın and Monje present a review discussing how microenvironmental interactions guide and modulate myelination, from oligodendrocyte precursor cell migration to oligodendrocyte differentiation and the formation of stable myelin internodes. During development and beyond, neuron-oligodendroglial interactions shape activity and experience-dependent myelin adaptations to fine-tune circuit dynamics and promote healthy neurological function.
  • Tissue mechanics in stem cell fate, development, and cancer

    • Mary-Kate Hayward,
    • Jonathon M. Muncie,
    • Valerie M. Weaver
    Mechanical cues direct cell fate and shape tissue development and homeostasis. Here, Hayward et al. discuss how dysregulation of tissue forces increases risk of malignancy, promotes tumor aggression, and induces a stem-like phenotype in tumor cells, which drives tumor aggression and treatment resistance.
  • Niches that regulate stem cells and hematopoiesis in adult bone marrow

    • Stefano Comazzetto,
    • Bo Shen,
    • Sean J. Morrison
    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitors are essential for blood production and reside in specialized niches in the adult mammalian bone marrow. In this review, Comazzetto et al. describe our current understanding of HSC and progenitor cell niches, focusing on recent progress and important unresolved questions.
  • Extracellular vesicles: Critical players during cell migration

    • Bong Hwan Sung,
    • Carole A. Parent,
    • Alissa M. Weaver
    Cell migration is essential for the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms and also contributes to the pathogenesis of disease. Sung et al. review recent studies describing the functions of extracellular vesicles in various aspects of cell motility, including directional sensing, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, and leader-follower behavior.
  • Microenvironmental control of cell fate decisions in mammary gland development and cancer

    • Gat Rauner,
    • Charlotte Kuperwasser
    Cell fate decisions are regulated by soluble factors, the physical properties of biomaterials surrounding the cell, and the cellular makeup of the microenvironment. Here, Rauner and Kuperwasser review how the mammary microenvironment controls cell fate during development and tissue regeneration and how it can promote oncogenesis resulting in breast cancer.

Articles

Resource

  • Oncogene-regulated release of extracellular vesicles

    • Seda Kilinc,
    • Rebekka Paisner,
    • Roman Camarda,
    • Suprit Gupta,
    • Olga Momcilovic,
    • Rebecca A. Kohnz,
    • Baris Avsaroglu,
    • Noelle D. L’Etoile,
    • Rushika M. Perera,
    • Daniel K. Nomura,
    • Andrei Goga
    Kilinc et al. demonstrate that oncogenes alter released vesicle number and size as well as their heterogeneity. Oncogenes alter ceramide and ESCRT pathways involved in sEV production. MYC and AURKB oncogenes downregulate lysosome pathway and utilize EV release to maintain cellular homeostasis.
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