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Current Biology
This journal offers authors two options (open access or subscription) to publish research

Aug 08, 2022

Volume 32Issue 15p3221-3442, R807-R854
On the cover: An Asian yellow-legged hornet (Vespa velutina) landing on a diaspore of Chinese agarwood plants (Aquilaria sinensis) just after fruit dehiscence and diaspores are exposed to air. In this issue, Qin et al. (pages 3429–3435) demonstrate that rapid seed dispersal by hornets is essential for the short-lived seeds of the agarwood plant. Hornets are attracted rapidly by highly volatile fruit chemicals, which appear to have been achieved by re-purposing of volatiles utilized in plant defense. Rapid seed dispersal seems widespread, and volatiles are effective signals. Image by Zhu RenBin; used with permission....
On the cover: An Asian yellow-legged hornet (Vespa velutina) landing on a diaspore of Chinese agarwood plants (Aquilaria sinensis) just after fruit dehiscence and diaspores are exposed to air. In this issue, Qin et al. (pages 3429–3435) demonstrate that rapid seed dispersal by hornets is essential for the short-lived seeds of the agarwood plant. Hornets are attracted rapidly by highly volatile fruit chemicals, which appear to have been achieved by re-purposing of volatiles utilized in plant defense. Rapid seed dispersal seems widespread, and volatiles are effective signals. Image by Zhu RenBin; used with permission.

Magazine

Feature

  • Mining noise set to rock the oceans

    • Michael Gross
    Faced with an ultimatum expiring next June, the International Seabed Authority is now drawing up regulations for deep-sea mining. One of the issues that have been insufficiently explored is noise emission, which could disrupt ecosystems in vast areas.

Book review

  • The remarkable world of bees

    • Elizabeth A. Tibbetts
    While it may be impossible to know exactly what an animal is thinking, most people have speculated about the feelings, perceptions, and motivations of animals. What is your cat thinking when it disrupts your work by walking across your computer keyboard? What does your dog experience when it sniffs the air during a walk? How does a bird feel when it finds a feeder full of sunflower seeds in the middle of winter?

Q & A

Quick guide

  • Aphid-farming ants

    • Aniek B.F. Ivens,
    • Daniel J.C. Kronauer
    Ivens and Kronauer provide an overview of the farming mutualism between ants and aphids, in which ants protect aphids in exchange for food.

Primer

  • Dopamine

    • Kauê Machado Costa,
    • Geoffrey Schoenbaum
    Dopamine is a fascinating neurotransmitter that has captivated scientists and the public in the last decades. In this Primer, Costa and Schoenbaum discuss the mammalian midbrain dopamine system, highlighting key principles of dopamine signaling, how it regulates behavior and goes awry in disease, its evolutionary history, and exciting recent developments.

Correspondences

  • Adults learn to identify pain in babies’ cries

    • Siloé Corvin,
    • Camille Fauchon,
    • Roland Peyron,
    • David Reby,
    • Nicolas Mathevon
    Using playback experiments, Corvin et al. show that current parents of young babies are able to identify a baby’s pain cries even if they have never heard this baby before, whereas inexperienced individuals are typically unable to do so. This shows how parenting shapes our ability to decode the information conveyed by babies’ communication signals.
  • All essential endosymbionts of the ciliate Euplotes are cyclically replaced

    • Vittorio Boscaro,
    • Mitchell J. Syberg-Olsen,
    • Nicholas A.T. Irwin,
    • Emma E. George,
    • Claudia Vannini,
    • Filip Husnik,
    • Patrick J. Keeling
    Boscaro et al. describe a symbiotic system, the ciliate Euplotes, where all intracellular bacterial symbionts are recently established and continuously replace each other despite being essential for their host, making the symbiosis ancient for the ciliate but recent for each bacterial lineage.

Dispatches

Articles

  • UBP12 and UBP13 deubiquitinases destabilize the CRY2 blue light receptor to regulate Arabidopsis growth

    • Louise N. Lindbäck,
    • Yuzhao Hu,
    • Amanda Ackermann,
    • Oliver Artz,
    • Ullas V. Pedmale
    Cryptochrome (CRY) receptors are crucial for growth and circadian clock. Lindbäck et al. report that UBP12 and UBP13 deubiquitinases function in the CRY2-mediated pathway to modulate hypocotyl growth under blue light. UBP12/13 interacts with CRY2 and COP1, stabilizing COP1 to promote CRY2 ubiquitination and turnover under blue light.
  • Northeastern Asian and Jomon-related genetic structure in the Three Kingdoms period of Gimhae, Korea

    • Pere Gelabert,
    • Asta Blazyte,
    • Yongjoon Chang,
    • Daniel M. Fernandes,
    • Sungwon Jeon,
    • Jin Geun Hong,
    • Jiyeon Yoon,
    • Youngmin Ko,
    • Victoria Oberreiter,
    • Olivia Cheronet,
    • Kadir T. Özdoğan,
    • Susanna Sawyer,
    • Songhyok Yang,
    • Ellen McRae Greytak,
    • Hansol Choi,
    • Jungeun Kim,
    • Jong-Il Kim,
    • Choongwon Jeong,
    • Kidong Bae,
    • Jong Bhak,
    • Ron Pinhasi
    Gelabert et al. report the first paleogenomic data from the Korean Three Kingdoms period. All individuals are modeled as an admixture between a northern-China Bronze Age genetic source and a Jomon-related ancestry. Phenotypically relevant SNPs show genetic continuity with modern Koreans.
  • Selective enhancement of neural coding in V1 underlies fine-discrimination learning in tree shrew

    • Joseph W. Schumacher,
    • Matthew K. McCann,
    • Katherine J. Maximov,
    • David Fitzpatrick
    Schumacher et al. show that learning fine visual discriminations is accompanied by enhancement in the discrimination capacity of tree shrew V1 neurons. This enhancement results from persistent changes in the tuning properties of a select group of task-relevant neurons that lead to predictable biases in the performance of other visual discriminations.
  • Fluctuating selection on bacterial iron regulation in the mammalian gut

    • Hugo C. Barreto,
    • Beatriz Abreu,
    • Isabel Gordo
    Iron is a key determinant of host-microbe interactions. Barreto et al. show that an E. coli iron regulator undergoes fluctuating selection in the gut. They find that the immune system, the microbiota, and antibiotic treatment modulate selection for or against iscR function, providing insights into how microbial evolution is shaped by the host.
  • Medial prefrontal cortex lesions disrupt prepotent action selection signals in dorsomedial striatum

    • Adam T. Brockett,
    • Stephen S. Tennyson,
    • Coreylyn A. deBettencourt,
    • Madeline Kallmyer,
    • Matthew R. Roesch
    Here, Brockett et al. show that lesions to medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) disrupt action initiation but not the inhibition or adaptation of action plans on a variant of the stop-signal task. Moreover, Brockett et al. show that lesions to mPFC alter directional signaling in dorsomedial striatum.
  • Multimodal cues displayed by submissive rats promote prosocial choices by dominants

    • Michael Joe Munyua Gachomba,
    • Joan Esteve-Agraz,
    • Kevin Caref,
    • Aroa Sanz Maroto,
    • Maria Helena Bortolozzo-Gleich,
    • Diego Andrés Laplagne,
    • Cristina Márquez
    Open Access
    Gachomba et al. show that social status modulates prosocial choices. Dominant decision-makers are more prosocial, and submissive rats are better at communicating their need for help. Quantitative analysis of multimodal social dynamics reveals body language and increased behavioral coordination as factors promoting the emergence of prosociality.
  • A three-eyed radiodont with fossilized neuroanatomy informs the origin of the arthropod head and segmentation

    • Joseph Moysiuk,
    • Jean-Bernard Caron
    Many early arthropods are known only from rare, fragmentary fossils. Moysiuk and Caron describe hundreds of new, exceptional Cambrian fossils of the radiodont Stanleycaris hirpex, revealing surprising features such as a median eye and preserved neuroanatomy. They set out a new theory for the evolution of key features of the arthropod body plan.
  • Neural network organization for courtship-song feature detection in Drosophila

    • Christa A. Baker,
    • Claire McKellar,
    • Rich Pang,
    • Aljoscha Nern,
    • Sven Dorkenwald,
    • Diego A. Pacheco,
    • Nils Eckstein,
    • Jan Funke,
    • Barry J. Dickson,
    • Mala Murthy
    Open Access
    Baker et al. discover and functionally characterize over 20 new auditory cell types in the Drosophila brain. They map synaptic connectivity among all known auditory neurons and find that the auditory system is densely interconnected, suggesting that connections between differently tuned neurons are important for shaping auditory responses.
  • Structured sampling of olfactory input by the fly mushroom body

    • Zhihao Zheng,
    • Feng Li,
    • Corey Fisher,
    • Iqbal J. Ali,
    • Nadiya Sharifi,
    • Steven Calle-Schuler,
    • Joseph Hsu,
    • Najla Masoodpanah,
    • Lucia Kmecova,
    • Tom Kazimiers,
    • Eric Perlman,
    • Matthew Nichols,
    • Peter H. Li,
    • Viren Jain,
    • Davi D. Bock
    Open Access
    By mapping synaptic connectivity in a whole-brain electron microscopy volume of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, Zheng et al. show that sensory input to a canonical associative memory circuit is not sampled at random. Rather, food-responsive olfactory projection neurons converge preferentially onto specific Kenyon cell subtypes.
  • Ets21C sustains a pro-regenerative transcriptional program in blastema cells of Drosophila imaginal discs

    • Melanie I. Worley,
    • Nicholas J. Everetts,
    • Riku Yasutomi,
    • Rebecca J. Chang,
    • Shrey Saretha,
    • Nir Yosef,
    • Iswar K. Hariharan
    Open Access
    Regeneration requires cell-specific transcriptional responses. Worley, Everetts et al. investigate the gene regulatory networks that are activated during regeneration and find that the transcription factor Ets21C is critical for effective regeneration by sustaining a pro-regenerative transcriptional program in a subpopulation of blastema cells.

Reports

  • Brain-wide bidirectional neuropeptide modulation of individual neuron classes regulates a developmental decision

    • Cynthia M. Chai,
    • Heenam Park,
    • Paul W. Sternberg
    Chai et al. combine comprehensive functional screening of neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptor mutants with cell-type-specific receptor expression analysis to reveal that brain-wide antagonistic modulation of individual neuron classes by unique receptor repertoires regulates larval developmental decision-making.
  • Comparative transcriptomics reveals the molecular toolkit used by an algivorous protist for cell wall perforation

    • Jennifer V. Gerbracht,
    • Tommy Harding,
    • Alastair G.B. Simpson,
    • Andrew J. Roger,
    • Sebastian Hess
    Open Access
    Gerbracht et al. present a transcriptome assembly of the algivorous flagellate Orciraptor agilis and analyze gene expression throughout its life history. This analysis reveals diverse carbohydrate-active enzymes with a presumed key function in the recognition of Orciraptor’s algal food and cell wall lysis during feeding.
  • Negative frequency-dependent selection on polymorphic color morphs in adders

    • Thomas Madsen,
    • Bo Stille,
    • Beata Ujvari,
    • Dirk Bauwens,
    • John A. Endler
    Madsen, Endler et al. study an island population of adders (Vipera berus) that shows annual variation in frequency of two color morphs, zigzag and melanistic, in adult males and females. This strongly suggests that the color pattern polymorphism is maintained by negative frequency-dependent natural selection.
  • Legacy of supervolcanic eruptions on population genetic structure of brown kiwi

    • Jordan B. Bemmels,
    • Oliver Haddrath,
    • Rogan M. Colbourne,
    • Hugh A. Robertson,
    • Jason T. Weir
    Bemmels et al. model changing landscapes in New Zealand to understand genetic structure in brown kiwi. Two prehistoric eruptions of the Taupo supervolcano devastated habitats and modified existing patterns of genetic diversity and population differentiation. Signatures of these ancient eruptions persist in genetic structure to the present day.
  • Flexible and digestible wood caused by viral-induced alteration of cell wall composition

    • Holly Allen,
    • Leo Zeef,
    • Kris Morreel,
    • Geert Goeminne,
    • Manoj Kumar,
    • Leonardo D. Gomez,
    • Andrew P. Dean,
    • Axel Eckmann,
    • Cinzia Casiraghi,
    • Simon J. McQueen-Mason,
    • Wout Boerjan,
    • Simon R. Turner
    Open Access
    Apple rubbery wood (ARW) infections cause the branches to become abnormally flexible. Allen et al. demonstrate that the symptoms are caused by a specific decrease in lignin deposition, resulting from decreased flux through phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL). PAL is downregulated by siRNAs that are generated by the plant upon ARW infection.
  • Hippocampal signals modify orbitofrontal representations to learn new paths

    • Justin S. Riceberg,
    • Aditya Srinivasan,
    • Kevin G. Guise,
    • Matthew L. Shapiro
    Riceberg et al. show that CA1 ensembles strongly interact with and entrain OFC ensembles only when learning a spatial reversal for the first time. Interactions vanish once associations become familiar. The results suggest a mechanism for linking novel episodes with expected reward outcomes.
  • Abdominal serial homologues of wings in Paleozoic insects

    • Jakub Prokop,
    • Kateřina Rosová,
    • Ewa Krzemińska,
    • Wiesław Krzemiński,
    • André Nel,
    • Michael S. Engel
    Prokop et al. demonstrate serial homologues of thoracic wings on abdominal segments I–IX in the form of hinged lateral outgrowths preserved in Paleozoic palaeodictyopteran larvae. These flaps could relate to locomotive, respiratory, or sensory functions. This body plan resembles the “protopterygote” model of a hypothetical ancestor for Pterygota.
  • Active vision during prey capture in wild marmoset monkeys

    • Victoria Ngo,
    • Julia C. Gorman,
    • María Fernanda De la Fuente,
    • Antonio Souto,
    • Nicola Schiel,
    • Cory T. Miller
    Open Access
    Ngo, Gorman et al. characterized the natural prey-capture behavior of wild marmoset monkeys to illustrate the integral role of active vision for effective hunting. Markerless-tracking analyses revealed how marmosets visually track insects and how visual feedback guides and adjusts rapid hand movements to capture flying insects.
  • Plant-defense mimicry facilitates rapid dispersal of short-lived seeds by hornets

    • Rui-Min Qin,
    • Ping Wen,
    • Richard T. Corlett,
    • Yuanye Zhang,
    • Gang Wang,
    • Jin Chen
    Qin et al. demonstrate that rapid seed dispersal by hornets is essential for short-lived seeds of an agarwood plant. Hornets are attracted rapidly by highly volatile fruit chemicals, which appear to have been achieved by re-purposing of volatiles utilized in plant defense. Rapid seed dispersal seems widespread, and volatiles are effective signals.
  • Episodic-like memory in common bottlenose dolphins

    • James R. Davies,
    • Elias Garcia-Pelegrin,
    • Luigi Baciadonna,
    • Cristina Pilenga,
    • Livio Favaro,
    • Nicola S. Clayton
    Open Access
    Davies et al. provide evidence of episodic-like memory in dolphins. Dolphins were able to use incidentally encoded spatial (“where”) and social (“who”) information to solve an unexpected memory task. This suggests that dolphins can recall and access information within remembered events, which is an ability indicative of episodic memory in humans.
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