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Neuron
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Sep 13, 2017

Volume 95Issue 6p1227-1432
Open Archive
On the cover: 乱 (RAN) A Japanese character for chaos or revolt. Because RAN translation produces up to six unexpected proteins using as-yet-undefined translational mechanisms, it has raised scientific questions about how these proteins are made and their role in disease. It seems fitting therefore that the Japanese character for RAN (乱) literally means “chaos” or “revolt.” The six languages shown depict the six RAN proteins produced, three in one direction and three in the other. The languages also represent international collaboration and six of the different languages spoken by co-authors of the Zu et al. paper (pages 1292–1305) and researchers in the Ranum lab....
On the cover: 乱 (RAN) A Japanese character for chaos or revolt. Because RAN translation produces up to six unexpected proteins using as-yet-undefined translational mechanisms, it has raised scientific questions about how these proteins are made and their role in disease. It seems fitting therefore that the Japanese character for RAN (乱) literally means “chaos” or “revolt.” The six languages shown depict the six RAN proteins produced, three in one direction and three in the other. The languages also represent international collaboration and six of the different languages spoken by co-authors of the Zu et al. paper (pages 1292–1305) and researchers in the Ranum lab.

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Q&A

  • Earl K. Miller

    Earl Miller studies the neural basis of high-level cognitive functions. In an interview with Neuron, he discusses the need for a holistic approach to figure out the brain, how ideas don’t happen in a vacuum, and the challenge of convincing the public that science produces facts; he also shares an open invitation to see Pavlov’s Dogz.
  • David Rowitch

    David Rowitch is a physician-scientist studying developmental genetics of glia in health and disease. In an interview with Neuron, he talks about the importance of single-cell and whole-genome sequencing and the need for raw data sharing and tissue banks encompassing human brain development and disease, and encourages active crosstalk between basic scientists and clinicians.

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NeuroResource

  • In Vivo Magnetic Recording of Neuronal Activity

    • Laure Caruso,
    • Thomas Wunderle,
    • Christopher Murphy Lewis,
    • Joao Valadeiro,
    • Vincent Trauchessec,
    • Josué Trejo Rosillo,
    • José Pedro Amaral,
    • Jianguang Ni,
    • Patrick Jendritza,
    • Claude Fermon,
    • Susana Cardoso,
    • Paulo Peixeiro Freitas,
    • Pascal Fries,
    • Myriam Pannetier-Lecoeur
    Caruso et al. report in vivo, intra-cortical recordings of magnetic fields that reflect neuronal activity, using magnetrodes, i.e., micron size magnetic sensors based on spin electronics.

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