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Neuron
This journal offers authors two options (open access or subscription) to publish research

Oct 11, 2017

Volume 96Issue 2p247-534
Open Archive
On the cover: English et al. (pages 505–520) determined that synaptic connections can be identified from the relative timing of two neurons. Moreover, they found that the timing of network activity influences instantaneous connection strength. This image represents these structure-timing relationships, obtained from the raw data which makes up the background. Artwork by Simon Sun....
On the cover: English et al. (pages 505–520) determined that synaptic connections can be identified from the relative timing of two neurons. Moreover, they found that the timing of network activity influences instantaneous connection strength. This image represents these structure-timing relationships, obtained from the raw data which makes up the background. Artwork by Simon Sun.

Editorial

  • Exciting Times Ahead

    • Mariela Zirlinger
    Neuroscience as a broad and growing discipline encompasses many fields of study, from molecular to systems-level, including cognitive and theoretical domains. These are exciting times for neuroscience, when many of these traditionally separate efforts are beginning to converge, and one can envision the day we may be able to respond to some fundamental questions, such as how molecules, cells, and circuits interplay to make us feel, act, and ultimately understand who we are. I am delighted to be the new Editor-in-Chief of Neuron, whose mission is to continue to disseminate the highest quality work in neuroscience.

Previews

  • Mapping Brain Activity onto Molecularly Defined Cells

    • Alexander Jones,
    • Leon G. Reijmers
    The brain processes information and generates behavior by employing a wide array of different cell types. In this issue of Neuron, Wu et al. (2017) report a novel method that enables the efficient identification of molecularly defined cells that participate in a specific brain function.
  • Obsessing about Uncertainty?

    • Jacqueline Scholl,
    • Matthew F.S. Rushworth
    A striking observation in obsessive-compulsive disorder is that patients know that their obsessions and compulsions are excessive, but their symptoms nevertheless persist. Drawing on computational models from basic neuroscience, Vaghi and colleagues suggest a quantitative account of this clinical finding.
  • A Corticostriatal Balancing Act Supports Skill Learning

    • Victoria L. Corbit,
    • Susanne E. Ahmari,
    • Aryn H. Gittis
    In this issue of Neuron, Kupferschmidt et al. reveal the shifting dynamics of functionally defined corticostriatal pathways during skill learning in mice using fiber photometry. They show different time courses in plasticity of associative and sensorimotor circuits across learning that involve changes at both the synaptic and cortical level.
  • Implicit and Explicit Learning Mechanisms Meet in Monkey Prefrontal Cortex

    • Matthew V. Chafee,
    • David A. Crowe
    In this issue, Loonis et al. provide the first description of unique synchrony patterns differentiating implicit and explicit forms of learning in monkey prefrontal networks. Their results have broad implications for how prefrontal networks integrate the two learning mechanisms to control behavior.

Spotlight

  • Nuclear Pore Protein Meets Transcription Factor in Neural Fate

    • Taro Kitazawa,
    • Filippo M. Rijli
    How nuclear architecture contributes to transcriptional regulation in neural progenitor cells (NeuPCs) is poorly understood. A study by Toda et al. (2017) now shows that the nuclear pore protein Nup153 associates with the Sox2 transcription factor in the regulation of NeuPC maintenance and neural fate.

NeuroView

Perspective

  • Striatal Local Circuitry: A New Framework for Lateral Inhibition

    • Dennis A. Burke,
    • Horacio G. Rotstein,
    • Veronica A. Alvarez
    Striatum integrates cortical and limbic information to assist in the selection of appropriate behaviors. Burke et al. review recent findings implicating local striatal circuitry in this computation and hypothesize a framework wherein lateral inhibition between projection neurons facilitates action selection.

Reviews

NeuroResource

  • Detecting Activated Cell Populations Using Single-Cell RNA-Seq

    • Ye Emily Wu,
    • Lin Pan,
    • Yanning Zuo,
    • Xinmin Li,
    • Weizhe Hong
    Wu et al. develop Act-seq, which minimizes artificially induced transcriptional changes during single-cell dissociation and thus enables faithful characterization of baseline transcriptional profiles and detection of specific cell populations activated by physiological stimuli using single-cell sequencing.

Reports

Articles

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