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Trends in Cancer
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Modeling tumor plasticity in organoid models of human cancer

  • John R. Christin
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA

    Department of Genetics and Development, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA

    Department of Urology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA

    Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA

    Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
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  • Michael M. Shen
    Correspondence
    Corresponence
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA

    Department of Genetics and Development, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA

    Department of Urology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA

    Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA

    Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Search for articles by this author
Published:January 06, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trecan.2021.12.004
      Due to its inherent plasticity and heterogeneity, cancer is a difficult disease to model both in vitro and in vivo. However, recent advances in organoid technology hold great promise for future research into the mechanisms underlying tumor plasticity in human cancers.

      Keywords

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