Video Archive

  1. Rock-a-bye baby: Science to the rescue

    Infant crying and sleep problems are major sources of parental stress, but up until now there have been few things that parents could do. Here, RIKEN researchers propose an evidence-based, cost-free method to sooth crying babies and lay them down to sleep. Parenting needs science!

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  2. Emotional tears in dogs during reunion with owner

    Human sometimes show tearing in response to emotional arousal, but emotional-elicit tearing in animals has not been clearly demonstrated. Tear secretion increased significantly during reunions with the owner, and oxytocin, a social bonding hormone, administration increased tear secretion in dogs. Moreover, photos of a tearing dog attracted human caregiving behavior. This report shows that dogs secrete emotion-elicit tears, and these tears can facilitate human-dog emotional connections.

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  3. Snapping shrimp helmets protect against shock waves

    Snapping shrimp have helmet-like orbital hoods that protect their brains from the shock waves they produce with their snapping claws. Shock wave exposure slows shelter-seeking and causes loss of motor control in animals without orbital hoods. Orbital hoods protect snapping shrimp from blast-induced neurotrauma by dampening shock waves.

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  4. Stone tools improve diet quality in wild monkeys

    Tool use increased diet quality of wild bearded capuchin monkeys in two ways. First, it provided a more tightly balanced mix of macronutrients, rich in energy-providing fat and carbohydrate. Second, the macronutrient mix was more concentrated than on non-tooling days because it had less nutrient-diluting fiber. Reduced fiber not only increases the concentration of nutrients in the food, but also increases the efficiency with which they are absorbed from the gut.

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  5. Viral-induced flexible wood

    The paper describes how the symptoms of apple rubbery wood disease are induced by the virus. Symptoms arise by a decrease in lignin deposition in the fibers. This decrease is a result of the plant’s downregulation of a key step in the lignin biosynthesis pathway induced by small RNAs. This is remarkably similar to how genetic engineering has been used to alter the lignin biosynthesis pathway of trees in order to improve their properties for biofuels or the generation of novel materials.

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  6. Sustainability and circularity in research

    Cell Press editors Dr. Michelle Muzzio (iScience) and Dr. Kristina Vrouwenvelder (Chem) sit down with Prof. Jin Xuan, Chair in Low Carbon Processes and the Head of Department of Chemical Engineering at Loughborough. Prof. Xuan leads the £4.5 million UKRI Interdisciplinary Centre for Circular Chemical Economy, working with over 100 industrial partners to transform the UK £32bn chemical industry into a fossil-independent, climate-positive and environmentally friendly circular economy.

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  7. No cranial absorption of shocks in woodpeckers

    High-speed video analyses and biomechanical models show that woodpeckers are adapted to minimize the absorption of shocks by their cranial skeleton. By functioning as a stiff hammer during pecking, woodpeckers optimize their pecking performance while their brains still do not experience impact decelerations that are likely to cause concussions.

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  8. Clinical Trials in the Evolving Landscape of Precision Medicine

    In this Cell Press Virtual Panel, Cell Press editors discuss their hopes for moving clinical cancer research forward. This panel brings together editors from across the Cell Press cancer portfolio: Jiaying Tan from Cell, Steve Mao from Cancer Cell, Nikla Emambokus from Med, and Sara Hamilton from Cell Reports Medicine. Moderated by Cell Press VP of Editorial Deborah Sweet.

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  9. The Translational Relevance of Experimental Models in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Cancers that are able to successfully grow are the ones that have evolved mechanisms to escape the immune system. Immunotherapeutic strategies, such as checkpoint inhibitors, aim at targeting such escape mechanisms and unleashing the anti-tumor physiological immune responses.

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  10. A big, new species of flying reptile from Scotland

    Jagielska and coauthors present a new species of pterosaur from the Isle of Skye in Scotland: Dearc sgiathanach (“jark ski-an-ack”). The exquisitely preserved skeleton, with a wingspan of more than 2.5 m, is the largest of a middle Jurassic pterosaur, revealing that this lineage reached larger sizes earlier than once thought. Nonetheless, the skeleton is from a subadult individual, and it still had room to grow before its untimely death. Instead of a quiet prelude to their Cretaceous radiation, the Middle Jurassic was likely a key interval in pterosaur evolution.

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